Graduate Program Summary

The Department of Mathematics offers the following degrees in mathematics: Doctor of Philosophy, Master of Science, Master of Arts, Master of Science in Teaching and Master of Arts in Teaching.

There are opportunities for concentrated study in algebra, number theory, analysis, algebraic and differential geometry, topology, logic and set theory, differential equations, dynamical systems, probability theory, numerical analysis, numerical optimization, combinatorial analysis, graph theory, computer applications, biomathematics, imaging and mathematical physics.

The Department of Mathematics interacts closely with the Departments of Statistics, Computer and Information Sciences, Industrial and Systems Engineering, Electrical and Computer Engineering, Medicine and Physics. It participates in the program of the interdisciplinary Center for Applied Optimization; the NSF sponsored IGERT on Quantitative spatial ecology, evolution, and the environment; and a co-major with statistics.

The Department also participates in the Institute for Fundamental Theory, which sponsors programs on the cutting edge of theoretical and mathematical physics. These interactions offer a variety of opportunities for joint research projects.The Department houses the Center for Applied Mathematics, which sponsors programs for students and faculty interested in applied mathematics.

Aside from the regularly scheduled courses, the department offers a wide variety of seminars and special topics courses, and frequently hosts international conferences. Several of the seminars resulted from graduate students approaching the department faculty with their areas of interest.

Special topics courses during the academic year are also sparked by student interest. While the course of study has specific requirements, there is flexibility for students to originate courses and seminars and design their program of studies.